S2000 Rear Spoiler

I’ve always liked the look of the OEM Honda S2000 rear spoiler.  For me, the rear of the car just doesn’t look “finished” unless there is a spoiler there.  And as a bonus you get some extra aero grip to boot.  Can’t go wrong with that…  Yeah right!  😉

Just like the front air dam lip that I installed previously on my S2000 (Click here), the rear spoiler is a legit Honda accessory.  These accessories are rather pricey but they fit perfectly and come painted to match the body color.  The front lip is no longer available but the rear spoiler is – so I finally broke down and ordered one.  The rear spoiler mounts with 4 fasteners requiring 4 holes drilled on the trunk lid. 😯

This part takes patience.  The outside holes get drilled from the inside of the trunk lid.  There are two small alignment marks that get center-punched and drilled.  This allows trial fitting the spoiler and marking the center holes with furnished adhesive discs.  This second set took some extra careful attention!

This is what the wing looks like out of the box…

And this is the mounting kit…

So after drilling the holes and some careful dressing with a fine file, I applied some touch-up paint to the edges of each hole.  For that I used this…

After applying the paint, I let it dry and followed up by adding over each hole a special rubber spacer included in the installation kit.  Ended up looking like this…

And then, the moment of truth.  Mounting the spoiler and tightening the 4 fasteners.  And this is what the wing looks like after I cinched up all four fasteners…

Looks pretty nifty, huh?

Oh and one last note…

The wing kit comes with two replacement torsion bars (the springs) and an optional wrench to install them with.  The kit states the new torsion bars account for the extra weight added to the outside edge of the trunk.  I found this is not really a big deal.  So, I passed on the new torsion bar springs and will just hang on to them until needed.  This is what the springs and the tool look like..

 

2016 Mileage Roundup

I’ve thought about a post summarizing the 2016 mileage roundup of the fleet.  Questions such as “who will read it?” or “who cares?” came up, but then I read a post on DriveToFive and I changed my mind…

So borrowing Tyson’s idea from his blog, here is my 2016 mileage roundup:

Totals for: RedRock

Totals for: S2000

Totals for: bowtie6

Moral of the story, I need to drive MORE!!!

The daily driver is RedRock (duh!) and it did very well considering a 6.2L V8 with 400hp is under the hood.  The Camaro really does well on the open road though with an all time best of 24 mpg.  The S2000 and bowtie6 get driven only when the sun shines.  Matter of fact, the S2000 has seen the rain on the road only three times since I bought it.  Poor bowtie6, it got neglected big-time!  New Year’s resolution is to do something about this!

In closing, here is a gallery of all three dashboards taken on New Year’s day, 2017.  Should be interesting to see how this compares a year from now…

Note:

This might be one of the first times I post a picture of the mileage on bowtie6.  It shows 22,612 miles and this is a bit misleading (adding this as a reminder to myself too!):

  • I’ve driven my TR6 for 22,612 miles since I put it on the road after the full restoration.
  • The first engine – a 3.4L V6 from a Camaro –  ran for 14,513 miles.  That is when we discovered an irreparable frame failure with stress cracks and my cousin Jim built the new frame from scratch.
  • The 2.4L Ecotec engine/gearbox came from a Pontiac Solstice with only 8 miles on the odometer.  This powertrain was then installed in a new frame built at Jim’s shop.  On October 15th, 2011, bowtie6 left Jim’s shop and has been a hoot to drive.
  • The new Ecotec powertrain has 8,091 miles so far.

Fixing a Leaking 9 Inch Ford Rear End

Note the grade-8 washers

I have recently noticed that the 9″ Ford rear end in bowtie6 has started leaking.  Nothing severe mind you, but just enough to make a mess of the garage floor.  So I jacked the car up and slid my new Race Ramps under the rear tires.  As it turned out, all ten nuts holding the third member in place, were loose.

But why?  Sure, wear and tear might cause things to loosen up.  Not wanting to leave this up to chance, I did a handful of Google searches and sure enough…  According to what I read on several websites this is a common issue on 9″ Ford rear ends.  The solution is to use copper washers on each stud.

In Search of Copper Washers

As you can see in today’s featured picture, we used grade-8 washers when we put the rear end together.  At the time, that is all we had available and after a short conversation with my cousin Jim, he told me he was not able to source the right copper washers.  Hmmm…

Two sets of Ford copper washers

So I searched eBay for some copper washers for a 9″ Ford and success!  I found a vendor offering “original” vintage Ford washers exactly for this application.  After reading the auction, I promptly clicked the “buy-it-now” button and ordered two sets for $6.00 per set of 10 washers.  Not bad.

Delivery was very quick:  the washers arrived in yesterday’s mail.  Cool!  Today, I lifted the car up again and crawled under to replace the grade-8 washers with the new copper replacements.  According to my research the washers are very soft.  As the Nylock nuts compress the copper washer they “seat” and this prevents the nuts from backing out.  Of course, this never happened with the hardened grade-8 washers.

Washers Replaced

So here is what the new washers look like.

The new copper washers are smaller than the earlier ones (see the featured photo for the “before” look).  The advantage is they have somewhat collapsed to take shape.  This is the same principle behind the soft aluminum washer on the oil drain plug on my Honda S2000.  Another problem solved!

Happy New Year

And so, I bid you all a Happy New Year.  I hope 2017 brings you great fortune and good health.  Cheers!

 

Engine Rebuild in Time-Lapse Video

Some time ago, I posted an engine rebuild in time-lapse video of a Triumph Spitfire motor.  In case you want to see what that looks like, click here.  Well the history of Triumph engines is not exactly “stellar”.  You see, Triumph engines are not much more than glorified tractor motors.  In some cases, they started life as pump engines.  Want to piss off a Triumph purist?  Tell them their engines are tractor motors!!  😯

So back to today’s post…  My friend Michael sent me an email today with a very interesting link.  The link points to a YouTube video showing a rebuild of a classic Chrysler HEMI engine.  No tractor or pump engine folks!  This is the real deal; truly legendary stuff.  So kick back, and enjoy.

There is so much to see in this video.  I’ve watched it many times and every time I see something new.  But most impressive is:

  • The Intake –  the intake plenum and runners are all made from scratch from tubing.  Those long runners are for a reason:  produce torque.
  • The exhaust – check those tubes!!
  • The empty cans of beer – beer good!
  • The green MG Midget – pump motor anyone?  LOL!

This is an awesome video.  Thanks Michael!!

Incidentally, custom intakes and custom exhausts…  Been there done that.  My cousin Jim made both intake and exhaust from scratch in bowtie6:

Saving the best for last…  Here is a Chevy engine rebuild in time-lapse video…

Long live the Chevy Small Block!!

Somebody please give me a cigarette!  😉

Honda S2000 Soft Top

Honda S2000 soft top latch, fully locked…

The Honda S2000 soft top locks in place with two latches on either side of the inner windshield frame.  Unfortunately, bumpy roads can cause the latches to rattle from time to time.  My S2000 is no exception and the rattling is driving me nuts!  Today I did some research and found a Honda S2000 Soft Top TSB (in PDF format).  This TSB addresses various ways of solving squeaks and rattles on the Honda S2000 soft top.

As it turns out, the inside half of the latch has a plastic trim piece.  Under certain conditions this plastic trim will rattle.  The following picture shows the soft top partially retracted…

And a couple of more pictures showing what the latch looks like…

So the way the hinge works is by pressing the side button and letting the hinge open towards the front of the vehicle.  This releases the claw from the windshield frame.  In the middle photo above, you can see the inside half of the hinge surrounded by a plastic trim.  This is the source of the rattles.

A roll of Honda EPT Sealer

The Honda TSB talks about using Honda EPT sealer and wadding it up into a small piece.  Then wedging the wadded EPT Sealer between the latch and the plastic trim.   This fills the void and prevents the plastic from rattling.  fair enough…

But, I have no idea what “EPT Sealer” looks like, so I Googled it and found the picture on the left.  As it turns out EPT Sealer is sold in rolls.  I don’t need a whole roll.  Instead (according to the TSB) all I need is small strips about 10mm x 5mm.

What can I use instead of EPT Sealer?  💡

I noticed the EPT Sealer is roughly the same thickness as Craftsman toolbox drawer liner material.  I found an extra liner and cut a section as shown in the picture to the right.  This piece is about 1×4 inches in size.  More than enough to do the job!

I carefully cut small strips of this material.  The material took a little coercing to fit in between the latch and the plastic trim but the result is perfect!  If you look closely in the following picture you can actually see the little strip of material between the latch and the plastic trim (in the yellow circle):

Small strip of drawer liner shown in the yellow circle…

The solution described in the TSB works!  I drove my S2000 down a bumpy road not far from my home and no rattles.  Oh and I still have plenty of this material available, so if you want some shoot me an email (info at bowtie6 dot com).  I’ll be happy to send you a piece!

S2000 Update

My Honda S2000 has been a real joy to own.  Hard to believe it has been 4.5 years since I bought it from an estate sale and brought it home.  During this time expenses have been for fuel, oil, filters and a set of tires.  I also had the A/C system checked because it was a few ounces off.

Hard to believe the S2K had only 4,726 miles when I bought – ahem– stole it!

On purchase day…

Today, I took a picture of this same dash and it shows slightly more miles on it.  And this is interesting…  There is a thread on one of the forums where folks talk about how many miles they have on their S2K’s.  I’ve seen several photos of cars with 250,000 and more miles on the clock.  Hmmm…  I have a lot of driving to do!

Today…

Funny!  Today’s photo has a nicely centered and focused dash…  Thanks to my friend Tyson who has taught me how to correctly show mileage in a photo!

And finally…  Two complete opposites!  RedRock in the background and the S2K in the foreground.  The Camaro with tons of torque; the S2K just wishing…  The S2K with the agility of a gazelle, the Camaro just wishing…

I suppose I am a just a lucky sumbitch!!!  :mrgreen:

Opposites attract…